HR Lagniappe

Louisiana SHRM


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Am I Receiving You? #lashrm13

receiving(today’s post is by Doug Shaw who, as you will read, is quite excited about journeying to Louisiana and speaking at the upcoming SHRM State Conference).

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We’re less than three months away from the Louisiana State HR Conference and I don’t know about you, but I am already really excited about it. As well as being a chance to hear from a host of top drawer speaking talent, it will be my first visit to your lovely state since I passed briefly through Shreveport in 1986 on a bus from Denver to Miami. What had I been doing in Denver? Watching the Broncos beat the Redskins 31 to 30, courtesy of some fine quarterback action from John Elway, and a missed field goal by Redskins place kicker Max Zendejas. I’m looking forward to traveling the 7,500 kilometres from my home here in London England to see you in Baton Rouge.

If you are planning on joining in with my session on Building Social HR Leadership it would be a pleasure to see you there. What would be even better though, would be if you will engage with me now, or at some point before the event, to tell me what you think you’d like to learn with me? What does social media have to do with leadership? How can we use it to make a difference for us, our profession, our colleagues and our customers? I have loads of ideas I’m happy to share – and what I’d really like to do is create value for you by understanding your needs beforehand. If you would like to get in touch I would love to hear from you by email, or via my website or Twitter – whatever suits you best.

Looking forward to seeing you.

Doug

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Resolve to Be Flexible in 2013!

convo(This post, written by Lisa Horn, co-leader of SHRM’s Workplace Flexibility Initiative, originally appeared on the SHRM blog.  You will be interested to see that Louisiana is one of the 15 states that will be heavily involved with the When Work Works initiative this year!  You can follow Lisa on twitter for regular updates)

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It’s that time again when we make our resolutions for the New Year – resolutions that we may or may not keep, of course, but that we make nonetheless. As we turn the corner into 2013, here’s a resolution HR professionals should make (and keep!) for their organization: BE FLEXIBLE!

The 21st century workplace and workforce demand that organizations think about work differently.  Work, for example, is no longer someplace we go, but tasks we complete from home, the airport, or the Little League bleachers.  Work means delivering results for customers and clients, not sitting in a cubicle after the work is completed for no reason other than not wanting to be the first to leave.

The Building Construction Products Division of Caterpillar Inc., with 95 employees based in Cary, N.C., is a Sloan Award-winning worksite that focuses on results.  Here, the leadership realizes that flexibility is not only a necessity for employees to manage their personal and professional issues, but it also helps the company attract new talent, ensuring that the company remains competitive in its field.  Caterpillar Inc. focuses on results, rather than hours worked, so employees understand that as long as they get their work done, supervisors are able to support flexible work schedules without questions.

All 362 recipients of the 2012 Sloan Award for Excellence in Workplace Effectiveness and Flexibility are excellent examples of organizations that have figured out how to make work “work” for both the employer and employees.  Whether they are well-known large firms, or medium or small organizations known primarily in their own communities, they embrace workplace flexibility as a business strategy.

So whether you are wondering how to make workflex a reality for your organization in the coming year or whether your company already utilizes innovative flex strategies, resolve in 2013 to get involved with When Work Works, a joint project of the Society for Human Resource Management and Families and Work Institute.

This national workplace flexibility initiative brings cutting-edge resources, research, and best practices uncovered through the Sloan Award to HR professionals and business leaders across the country via a network of community partners.  When Work Works will be rolling into 15 target states in 2013 –Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Dakota, Washington – and continuing in California. Keep an eye out for a program near you!

Applications for the 2013 Sloan Award open on Jan. 14, providing you an opportunity to either showcase your organization’s flexible work environment or learn how your worksite stacks up against other employers. Apply online at www.whenworkworks.org.

Don’t let this resolution end up like that gym membership – unused! Flexible work is the future of work.  Your organization’s ability to compete may just depend on it.


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Light Bulb Moments and Getting Ready for #lashrm13

Baton Rouge downtown bridgeAs we get ready for the 2013 Louisiana SHRM State Conference on HR (#lashrm13), we thought it might be fun to share a recap post from the 2012 conference.  Bill Boorman led a concurrent session last year in New Orleans and we are thrilled to have him return for the 2013 event where he will be our closing keynote speaker on Tuesday, April 9th talking about “The ‘Cult’ of Work.” You’ll also be able to catch him running a concurrent session on Monday April 8th with Robin Schooling entitled “HR’s Turning Point: Are You Staying in Place or Moving Forward?”

Enjoy the post below which was Bill’s recap of the 2012 conference; we like to call it ‘a view from the UK.’  And make plans to join us in 2013 as we bring the conference to Baton Rouge!

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Light Bulb Moments from New Orleans #LASHRM

It’s been a few weeks now since I got back from #LASHRM in New Orleans. I have something I always do a few weeks after an event. I take some blank sheets of paper and I write down a few statements and words under 3 headings:

> What do I remember? What were the light bulb moments?

> Who do I remember?

> Out of 10, would I go back again?

Just for a change I thought it would share the first and last sections publicly, and for the record, in terms of who I remember, it was one of the longest lists from any event. This was a memorable event with a memorable crowd.

My light bulb moments:

> If you only connect with people like you, you will learn nothing and gain nothing.

> Diversity is as much about personality as colour, race etc

> Your network is your posse who are in your corner.

> If we all think the same some of us are irrelevant

> It’s not what you know it’s who you know, and that’s a good thing, despite negative connotations. Network intentionally.

> When you reward people for what you want them to do before you ask them to do it, they are much more likely to do what you want compared with rewarding them only if they do it.

> New Orleans is both one of the 5 most friendly cities in the world, and also the 5 most dangerous at the same time.

> Gumbo with everything is perfectly acceptable.

> It’s better to be the party than go to the party.

> People who earn $14.5 Mn a year essentially want the same things from work and colleagues as people on minimum wage. People are people whatever the status.

> Creating opportunities for accidental engagement is the best way to get people to ask what they really want to know. talking in places like car parks and water coolers beats meetings in offices because of informality. Executives need to create plenty of opportunities for this to happen.

> 5% of the people influence the behavior of the other 95%. The key is knowing who the 5% are, what motivates them and reaching them.

> Its more effective to manage the work rather than the hours.

> It’s easier to take the work to where the skills are than take try to bring the skills to the work.

> People have better technology in their houses than they have in their offices.

> Don’t be afraid to fly the freak flag.

> Best practice is not innovation.

> State conferences beat champagne headline events for content and community.

> Police horses fit in bars.

> You can tap dance by fitting tin can lids on the bottom of your shoes.

>If you are communicating the need for change, you need to deliver it as a benefit to the ones who are going to have to do the changing, not the benefit to you.

> When you give an order, people will follow but absolve themselves from responsibility for the outcome.

> American service can be as bad as UK service, they just wish you a “nice day” after.

> I’d like to work for Rose Hudson, the CEO of Louisiana State Lottery.

> The worst and most dangerous type of prejudice is delivered by people who would not consider themselves prejudiced.

> You don’t go to work, work comes to you.

> Robin Schooling is quite brilliant at getting everyone together. We all went to New Orleans because Robin asked. That’s the power of personal connections.

> Everyone in Louisiana talks about their life in 2 parts. Before the storm and after the storm.

> User adoption is more important than technical capability in HR Tech.

> Most people operate their current technology at 20%.

> New Orleans has gone through the rebuilding period and is now in the renaissance period. Town branding is important for its citizens.

> Jazz is quite cool but Blues is better.

> Big Al Carson should be a worldwide star.

That’s what I remembered from #LASHRM, and it’s a big list. I remembered a whole lot of new people. Thanks to you all, it was a lot of fun.

And the last bit, my score for if I would go back, it’s 11 out of 10! Brilliant conference. Brilliant time, and I’m already plotting #truNewOrleans for later in the year.

Bill


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HR Certification – its value to me

I always read with interest the debate within the HR community about the value of holding certification of professional credentials, specifically those through the Human Resource Certification Institute.  Since 2003, I have held my SPHR certification and had the PHR for 3 years before that.  Although I am an advocate for having the certification, I also recognize that it is not the end all be all of HR knowledge and there are many smart and accomplished HR pros who do not hold a certification of any kind, hold a certification other than through HRCI, and those who do not feel the value is enough to continue to hold such a thing.  Unfortunately, there are also those individuals out there with the initials PHR, SPHR, or GPHR after their name who do not represent the best and brightest of the human resource profession.

Speaking solely for myself, the certification has provided several benefits.  First, it forces me to keep current by achieving 60 recertification credits over a three year period of time.  Now, there are those who simply ease through and get whatever credits they can, but I like to think of myself as a diligent and conscientious person (most of the time!) and truly try to get something out of the programs or sessions I attend.  It seems that the possibilities to gain recertification credits continue to grow each year.   This can provide motivation for those not inclined to pursue additional formal education.  There have certainly been times during my MBA program that I have been able to benefit from the knowledge gained through the recertification process.

The second benefit I gain is recognition by others for my knowledge.  Those outside the HR practice arena are starting to recognize the certification and will look for it.  When I first attained my PHR certification, my supervisor at the time asked me what that PHR was and why I did it.  It meant nothing to her or the company at the time.  When I interviewed for my current position, the expectation was there that I not only have my certification, but that I pursue the SPHR within 2 years of joining the organization.  Within six months, I tested and passed and have maintained it ever since.  It is nice to see a growing number of HR related job postings placing some emphasis on it.

Finally, there are those who see the indication of professional certification as something that sets apart the willingness of someone to take a chance and do something to advance themselves.  I have been in several conversations with other HR professionals who have told me that they are not willing to take the exam because they are afraid that they might fail.  Life is about taking risks and as risks go, this is not a particularly dangerous one!  I view it as an investment in myself and when I first tested, a challenge to my fledgling HR knowledge.

As someone who holds a certification from HRCI, I am certainly in favor of strengthening the certification and what it takes to receive and maintain it.  There are those in every profession who do not hold up to the ideal of their title, certification, or degree.  My SPHR certification by itself does not represent who I am or what I know.  It does show that I was able to show mastery on a test over a particular set of subjects and that I have maintained knowledge in my chosen field of human resources.  It does not show my professionalism, the ability to apply the knowledge I have demonstrated, or that I am an avid roller coaster rider.  It’s important, no matter the certification, degree, or qualifications, that we ensure that the person brings the qualities we want to a position, and not simply a fancy set of letters after their name.  Certification is important to me for me; it doesn’t need to be an important factor to anyone else.

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This guest post from Brad Galin, SPHR originally ran on his blog RollercoasterHR where he writes about HR and roller coasters.  .
 
Spending much of his early life working in theme parks, first as a ride operator and later in public relations at Kings Island near Cincinnati, Ohio, Brad has had many unique and fun experiences since graduating from Indiana University.  Brad’s HR experience began in policy development and training for International Theme Park Services and took him around the world to train including extended assignments in China, Mexico, & Brazil.  Brad is now the Director of HR for Stone Belt, a non-profit organization with over 500 employees fulfilling its mission to prepare, empower, and support people with disabilities throughout south-central Indiana.  In addition to his day job, Brad currently serves as the Communications and Technology Director for the Indiana State Council of SHRM.
 
You can also follow Brad on Twitter.


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The Students Bring It: HR of the Future – #shrm12

This post was originally published at the HR Schoolhouse by Robin Schooling, Louisiana SHRM Communications Director and one of the #SHRM12 Official Bloggers.

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Each year, during the SHRM Annual Conference, the SHRM Student Conference is also held.  While we’re here in Atlanta enjoying the heat and humidity, the students are also meeting today and tomorrow (June 23rd and June 24th).

During the conference, the recipients of SHRM’s Outstanding Student Chapter Awards are announced.  The Outstanding Student Chapter Award is given in recognition of significant activities within the following areas: compliance with SHRM bylaws, fundraising efforts, educational events, volunteerism, professional development, internships, mentorships, newsletters and external communications, social media programs, legislative advocacy, support of the SHRM foundation and participation in seminars or conferences.

I’m a big fan of the work of the SHRM student chapters and each year usually make a trip (or two!) to local student chapter meetings.  Apparently they haven’t gotten sick of me yet because they keep inviting me back.  Then again, it might be because sometimes I swear when I’m either (1) sharing an HR horror story or (2) getting all riled up about the good/bad/ugly/exciting aspects of our chosen profession.

So let’s send a hearty congrats to the 2011-12 Outstanding Student Chapter Award Recipients:

  • Eastern Michigan University, #5041, Ypsilanti, MI
  • Louisiana State University of Shreveport, #5335, Shreveport, LA
  • McNeese State University, #5393, Lake Charles, LA
  • Meredith College, #5177, Raleigh, NC
  • Nicholls State University, #5431, Thibodaux, LA
  • Rutgers University, #5154, Newark, NJ
  • University of Guam, #5356, Mangilao, GU
  • University of North Texas, #5017, Denton, TX
  • University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, #5333, Mayaguez, PR
  • University of Tennessee, #5254, Knoxville, TN

And of course I have to add that I’m super proud, as a Louisiana HR pro, of the fantastic showing by the three SHRM Student Chapters from the State of Louisiana who’ve been selected as Outstanding Student Chapters for the 2011-12 award year:   Louisiana State University of Shreveport, McNeese State University, and Nicholls State UniversityAs an added benefit, another Louisiana SHRM Student Chapter was recognized as a Runner-Up for the award  – Southeastern Louisiana University.

There is awesome work being done by SHRM student chapter members and their extremely dedicated chapter advisors.  Thanks to all of them for focusing on HR of the future.


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Recaps, Conversations and Light Bulb Moments

It’s been close to a month since the Louisiana SHRM State Conference came to a successful conclusion and in the last few weeks there has been some more online content generated.  Check out a few more blog posts:

Louisiana SHRM Conference 2012: Recap (Day 2) – by Christine Assaf

Creating a Culture of “We” – An Engaging Conversation from #LASHRM12 – by Chris Ponder

Light Bulb Moments from New Orleans – #LASHRM – by Bill Boorman

We also captured some fantastic video interviews/testimonials with speakers and attendees.  Check them out here.

What a great conference we had!  You surely want to get in on the learning and the excitement next year, don’t you?  So make plans to join us in April 2013 in Baton Rouge!


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The Final News from #LASHRM12 – from the Social Media Trenches

The Louisiana SHRM State Conference on Human Resources is in the record books – highest attendance in years, lots of social engagement, packed session rooms and a lively Exhibit Hall/HR Solutions Center. We were fortunate to have a group of speakers and attendees who kept the twitter stream very active (#lashrm12 and #lashrm) who also wrote a number of blog posts before, during and after the conference.  In case you missed the conversations, you can find a number of them here:

From Chris Ponder at Performance I Create:

My First Day at #LASHRM12 = Freakin’ Rocked

My Second Day at #LASHRM12 – Handstands and Swag

From Buzz Rooney at The Buzz on HR

What I Learned at LASHRM 2012

More of What I Learned at LASHRM 2012

From Robin Schooling at HR Schoolhouse

Where One World Ends Another Begins

Gravity with a bit of HR Gravitas

From Shauna Moerke at HR Minion

LASHRM:  A Non Stop Good Time

From Bill Boorman at The Recruiting Unblog

Anarchy in the USA (Liveblog)

On the Couch with Dr. Dan (Liveblog)

HR:  The CEO’sView (Liveblog)

HR Influencing the 5% with @incentintel (Liveblog)

The Next Level with @ScottEblin (Liveblog)

Sunday Shout Out: @WilliamTincup – Community Freak

Cool Social Recruiting Tools with @Fishdogs

From Christine Assaf at HR Tact

Louisiana SHRM Conference 2012: Recap (Day 1)

From Dwane Lay at Lean HR Blog

OK and LASHRM Reflections

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